Monday, August 17, 2015

6 Steps to Reaching Your Most Difficult Students

Hi friends! I am Jennifer from everything just so. This is my first official post with the Primary Pack and I'm so excited to share a few tips and resources with you today!

For the bulk of my teaching career, I’ve always had at least one of “those” kids in my class. You know the ones - defiant, distracting, and determined to show you who’s really in charge. After several failed attempts at managing their behavior, I was in desperate need of new ways to reach those kids who needed me most. 

Starting from scratch, I began to understand that most behavior issues were the result of factors that had nothing to do with me, other students, or school as a whole. Not only did this realization give me greater insight into the students themselves, but also it freed me from taking blow-ups personally. I started incorporating several steps at the beginning of each year that led to fewer behavior problems, positive students, and a happier me.





Looking for ways to reach a difficult kid? Today I'm providing you with six steps to reaching even your most unruly student over on my blog. Plus, I'm linking to two free resources that give your students support along the way. To learn more, simply click here


For more resources and teaching ideas, please visit my blog at everythingjustso.org




6 comments:

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    1. Thanks, friend! There are two freebies linked to the photo - hope they are helpful! :)

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  2. These reminders are so helpful, Jennifer! I agree that making that strong connection with the student is the difference between a good year and a nightmare of a year.

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    1. So true! So many of us have to learn that the hard way, unfortunately. Thanks for the feedback! :)

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  3. Your strategies are practical and I love the kindness towards the students that just exudes from your post. I love your personal connection ideas - helping children to feel valued. I also appreciate the opportunity you give for parent feedback to all children plus the opportunity for postivie feedback too. Parents of difficult children (often for health reasons) need to get positive things about their child. There's nothing more discouraging that alway hearing that your child has not behaved... again!! I've taught for over 30 years and I would love to see more teachers use the ideas you've suggested.

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    1. Annette - I am so sorry that I am just now seeing your comment! Thank you so much for your kind and meaningful feedback. I completely agree that all parents need to hear positive feedback about their children, but especially those whose students struggle in school. Thanks again for reading the post and for your words - I truly appreciate you! - Jennifer

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